DC and Marvel movies killing other comic book movies

Are DC and Marvel comic book based movies are getting more attention at box office compared to other franchises? Check out what I think.

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By RedSkull667 - 11/5/2012
2012 was the year of some awesome movies. Many of them were based on literary works, fiction and most primarily comic books and graphic novels. Still out of these movies we simply choose to remember Avengers and The Dark Knight Rises. The Amazing Spider-Man became a victim of this epicness that was going around at the time it released and people just could not stop comparing it to other two. The box office war went ahead and killed several movies in the process because they failed to generate that attention and speculation that Avengers and TDKR did with worth millions of budget.



The latest victim of this drama or whatever you call it came out as Dredd. It was fairly well written and directed movie. The acting was superb and it was dark as much as it was supposed to be. Still people rejected it even before the movie came out because it didn’t look like Avengers or TDKR. The movie was good and yet it flopped.



Take another example as John Carter. Fanboy bashing begun as the trailers came out and even after the movie turned out good it was declared as a disappointed. There can be many other movies in the list as per individual but in the end this competition is killing smaller companies is not a good thing. There are movies we are not getting sequels because of the same reason. Other examples may include Men in Black 3, Prometheus etc. GI Joe moved ahead its release sensing the competition because of the same reason. Its not that audience have become smart and started liking movies with good stories, otherwise Battleship would be a box office disaster in that case.



If you check the number of CBMs coming next year and year followed after is increasing constantly. If this continues then other than Marvel and DC movies no movie will be able to stand or pass at box office in future and slowly CBMs will fade from the box office leaving only the powerful ones to survive. One of the effects that we are already seeing is with DC entertainment and WB who are not at all interested in coming up with new properties, it seems they have already forgotten Vertigo titles.

As fans atleast we should not reject a movie month before its release. If it is poorly made and directed audience will reject it anyways but if negative reviews start coming by the time before the movie comes out it generates a negative buzz among people who want to see it.
What do you think?
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9 Comments
Spideyguy94 - 11/5/2012, 7:54 AM
Dredd didn't make much money because the marketing absolutely sucked and it was rated R not because of TDKR and the avengers.
TheFirstAvenger97 - 11/5/2012, 8:29 AM
Yeah I didn't see one Dredd commercial on TV, some people didn't even know it came out.
CorndogBurglar - 11/5/2012, 9:13 AM
I saw tons of Dredd commercials, the marketing was there. The reason it bombed here in the US is because most people don't know Dredd aside from the shitty Stalone movie, so naturally, people didn't care to give it a try outside of comic fans that know better. Dredd just isn't a known character in the US.

As for John Carter. A shitty movie will always fail. Don't try to base its failure on Marve or DC.

Also, where were all these "smaller company comic movies" BEFORE Marvel and DC movies? I didn't see them getting made then, did you? Its ridiculous to say that Marvel/DC is killing that.

As for other movies moving their release dates to avoid competition with Avengers and Batman...boo hoo. Those are the movies people want to see.

I can't believe I just read an article that blames companies for making quality products.

Maybe they should have made the FIRST GI Joe movie good. Then maybe people would care about a sequel and it would have the backing to contend with Avengers and Batman. But you know what? GI Joe was a horrible mockery and failure. Same with John Carter. Don't blame Marvel and DC for that.
Preston - 11/5/2012, 9:30 AM
I think there are three reasons:

1). Supply and demand.




In a lot of ways, no one was asking for a Dredd or John Carter movie.

When movie audiences have been spoiled by top-tier heroes (like Superman, Batman, Spider-Man, X-Men, Avengers), why would they settle for a British cult comic hero (that very few people read about outside of the island) or a second rate Tarzan (that nobody under 90 cares about).

2). Marketing.




Avengers has been promoted in every MCU movie; plus, they spent millions on an Internet and TV campaign.

The Nolan Camp is well known for their viral and grass-roots marketing campaigns; plus, they also spent money on TV ads and Internet.

3). Word of mouth/HYPE.




Oscar/Golden Globe buzz can catapult an otherwise unknown property into making big money, but neither John Carter or Dredd qualify (again this probably has to do more with the extra push in marketing that the film receives from the nomination).

On the other hand, any Micheal Bay (Transformers) or Roland Emmerich (2012) movie that has been lambasted by critics can still make a killing at the box office because it appeals and has been marketed to the right demographic. The word of mouth and hype will void/negate the negative criticism by movie critics.

Hype is necessary for a movie to make bank.




Dredd failed because it had no hype, it was poorly marketed, and there was no demand for the movie (most of which can be attributed to it's shoestring budget).

John Carter was a family film that no family wanted to see. The marketing campaign cost the studio an estimated 100 Million, and the movie tanked. It was a movie that the studios couldn't save regardless to how much money the studios poured into it. It's hard to sell tickets to something that nobody cares about. There was no real HYPE surrounding the movie and the artificial hype (marketing) couldn't save it. In a world were Iron Man is possibly, Tarzan (and it's elk) are goners.



shwa77k - 11/5/2012, 11:04 AM
That was an interesting concept for an article. Unfortunately, due to the articles horrific grammar, I was forced to stop reading half way through. Either 1, you are unable to articulate a sentence, or 2, English is your second language.
calin88 - 11/5/2012, 2:15 PM
IMO, failing at the box office isn't the same thing with failing in general. Dredd will premiere in my country this week, and I can't wait to see it, because of what I've been reAding about it, maybe it won't even make it's budget, but a good movie is what it is! We won't get sequels but we will have another great R-Rated CBM among Watchmen, Sin City, 300. I think Batman should be R-rated, but the studio would never go for losing money like that
Tainted87 - 11/5/2012, 8:13 PM
Marketing was one of the biggest issues for both movies, but there were definitely other factors.

I REALLY liked John Carter, but it wasn't a movie kids want to see more than once. The beginning moves so very slowly that some audiences may in fact, get very bored and uninterested - unable to appreciate the other two-thirds of the film. This leads to another problem - everything on Earth (apart from the flashback) should have been completely and utterly wiped from the movie.

Dredd was different. I liked it, didn't love it. I went in expecting dystopian Dirty Harry, and I kind of got that, but some things just got a bit dull. The characters weren't interesting enough, and although the action was spectacular, the conclusion was extremely anti-climatic. None of this, of course, has anything to do with why audiences didn't go SEE it. Fact is, no one in the US knows Dredd from the comics, and when they see a commercial for a guy in a dorky-looking helmet scowling, they just aren't interested. It's shallow, but it is there. Also, the made-for-3D element is there.

Too much supply, not enough demand. It's a shame for some fans - they really wanted to see a sequel, but for me, I felt I saw everything I needed to.
CPBuff22 - 11/10/2012, 9:36 AM
I would defiantly say that DC movies are killing other franchises. The problem comes from the fact that until Avengers came out everyone was using Nolans Batman films as a template. Everything had to be dark and gritty even if it wasn't in the characters nature. General audiences have show time and time again in studio polls that they prefer movies to be more lighthearted. Even in serious dramas the audience polling shows they prefer a happy ending. So if every movie is done Nolan style you loose interest from the general populous.

Then we look at the NON Batman DC movies and how good they actually were. Superman Returns, Green Lantern, Green Hornet, Catwoman & The Spirit all left a lot to be desired. Watchmen was really good but that doesn't negate the bad taste left by the others. That in its self can cause a general audience to avoid Comic Book & Super Hero movies.

Its not just DC properties though as its more WB's fault than that of the DC characters. Sony & Fox can also be blamed for movies like Ghost Rider, Fantastic Four, X-Men Origins Wolverine, & Electra. All those franchises had a good chance of success but the studios involved failed to deliver.

Opt1mu5Pr1m4l - 12/28/2012, 11:58 AM
I agree. Go see the movie and then make your assumption. Don't not go see it just becuase the trailer doesn't look that good. Just because a trailer doesn't look good doesn't mean a movie is going to be crap.

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