EXCLUSIVE: Robert Rodriguez Discusses Hollywood, Film Making and SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR

<span style="color: red">EXCLUSIVE:</span> Robert Rodriguez Discusses Hollywood, Film Making and SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR

The next issue of The Red Bulletin doesn't hit newsstands until next week, but we've got an exclusive excerpt from the magazine with Robert Rodriguez, the co-director, producer, composer, cinematographer and editor of Sin City: A Dame To Kill For

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By Nathan Best - 8/8/2014
Robert Rodriguez

The folks over at The Red Bulletin were kind enough to send us an excerpt from their August 12th issue, which includes Ann Donahue's interview with Sin City: A Dame To Kill For's Robert Rodriguez. The entire article will appear in print, and online at www.TheRedBulletin.com next Tuesday.


Rodriguez is crazy enough to have changed the world of filmmaking. Instead of working under the watchful eye of corporate overlords in a huge a studio in Los Angeles, he operates Troublemaker out of Austin, Texas, in hangars on the city’s abandoned airport. He created all of his new movie, Sin City: A Dame To Kill For, here:  from casting to filming; from creating the wardrobe and props to composing the score; from the special-effects work to designing the posters. Given that his latest release is a sequel to Sin City, a movie that  made  US$158 million worldwide, this level of autonomy in the big-business, all-eyes-on-the-bottom- line world of Hollywood is astonishing.
“Someone else created the Hollywood system and the business, but for a creative person, it really doesn’t make a lot of sense,” says Rodriguez. “You have to have a little incubator of ideas where you can feel free to fail, feel free to take a chance on something. You can’t always go to a studio and say, ‘Hey, let me go borrow your soundstage, and I don’t even know why. I have an idea. Let me feel it out.’ They’d say, ‘Get out of here.’”

The closing credits of a Rodriguez film are thick with repetition: for Sin City 2, he’s the co- director, producer, composer, cinematographer and editor. “My favorite hobbies growing up were photography, drawing, music, making movies,” says Rodriguez. “I chose filmmaking because I could still keep all my favorite hobbies under the project of a film. So on all my early films, I did everything. And then as I got into the Hollywood system, I thought, ‘I don’t know why I should give up these things. They’re still some of my favorite jobs.’”

It’s a work ethic born from a history of making movies on a tight budget. Rodriguez’s first film, El Mariachi (1992), about a musician who is mistaken for a murderer, was made for $7,000. The distribution rights were acquired by Columbia Pictures, which then spent $1m to market the film. It went on to earn twice that amount, and the legend of Rodriguez as a run-and-gun director – someone who could shoot an entire feature film very cheaply, in just a month – was born.

Hollywood’s faith in Rodriguez was cemented by his Spy Kids series; the four films since 2001 earned over half a billion dollars globally. It gave him the power to pursue whatever passion project he wanted, and what he was obsessed with was a series of brutal film noir graphic novels by Frank Miller. “I would go to the comic book store, buy a Sin City, and go home and realize I already had three copies,” Rodriguez says. “I just loved it so much, and I knew nobody could ever make a movie out of it, because they would just ruin it.”

What entranced him was the book’s unique visual style. Miller draws in stark black-and- white lines; just like his characters, there are no shades of grey. He tells tales of disfigured murderers, prostitutes, vengeful cops and corrupt politicians. In the first Sin City film, Rodriguez brought to life the grit and gore using as much of Miller’s visceral style as he was comfortable showing in 2005. “The first film, I didn’t push it as far because I thought people wouldn’t understand what they were looking at,” says Rodriguez. “It would be too distracting, it would be too strange. And then people thought it was visually groundbreaking. I was like, ‘Oh my God, I didn’t even go all the way with it.’”

The filming of Sin City 2 began with one phone call: Rodriguez dialed the number of actress Jessica Alba, and asked her to turn up as soon as she could at Troublemaker. “I was like, ‘Oh my God, Robert, you have to give me more notice than this!’” says Alba, laughing. “But that’s the way it works.”

Since Alba appeared in the original Sin City as the exotic dancer Nancy Callahan, so she wasn’t surprised at Rodriguez’s spur-of-the moment summons. She’d received the script six months earlier and was working with a choreographer to master her dances in the sequel. After all that prep, her work in Austin was done in a matter of days. “He just bangs things out,” she says. “He’s really calm and kind.”

Besides Alba, Rodriguez had not cast any other actors when he started shooting. “When you have your own studio, you don’t have to ask permission to get going,” he says. “Once the train has left the station, people jump on board.” Sure enough, within days, those who had signed up included Eva Green, playing the titular dame to kill for, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who portrays a gambler on a mysterious mission.

Filming the first Sin City, Rodriguez was one of the pioneers of the green-screen technique, which places actors against a blank background and then fills in their surroundings digitally during post-production. Rodriguez’s green-screen soundstage at Troublemaker is immense, a cavernous set the size of an industrial factory floor, all painted in the DayGlo green of a tropical insect.

It can be a mind-bender for those who haven’t worked in the medium before. “When Josh Brolin showed up, he said, ‘Where’s Mickey Rourke?’ and I said, ‘I filmed him already,’” recalls Rodriguez. “And he said: ‘All my scenes are with Mickey?! He’s carrying me around and we’re drinking together and he’s driving me in cars!’ and I’m like, ‘I know. I’ll figure it out when I get there, and it will work because I’ve done it before.”

Sin City: A Dame To Kill For is made up of four of Miller’s stories: two previously unpublished, the title graphic novel and another, The Long Bad Night. The movie takes a vignette structure that mimics the first film, but Rodriguez wants this one to be bigger, bolder and more in line with the shock-and-awe style of Frank Miller’s works. It will retain the black-and-white severity of the original – but this time there will also be a 3D version. “I wanted to go further towards what the books originally offered,” says Rodriguez. “When you have a property like this that’s magical, you want to do right by it.”

For the remainder of the article, please visit: http://www.redbulletin.com/





Co-directors Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez reunite to bring Miller's visually stunning "Sin City" graphic novels back to the screen in 3D in Frank Miller's Sin City: A Dame To Kill. In a town where justice doesn't prevail, the desperate want vengeance and ruthless murderers find themselves with vigilantes on their heels. Their paths cross when they converge on Sin City’s famous Kadie's Club Pecos... The film opens with fan-favorite “Just Another Saturday Night,” when Marv (Mickey Rourke) finds himself in the center of carnage as he tries to remember the events leading up to it. “The Long, Bad Night” tells the tale of Johnny, a cocky young gambler (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) on a winning streak taking his chances with the biggest bastard of them all, Senator Roark (Powers Boothe). The central story, Miller’s critically acclaimed "A Dame To Kill For," has Dwight McCarthy (Josh Brolin) facing his final confrontation with the woman of his dreams and his nightmares, Ava Lord (Eva Green). “Nancy’s Last Dance" follows Nancy Callahan (Jessica Alba) in the wake of John Hartigan’s (Bruce Willis) death. On a downward spiral filled with grief, she will stop at nothing to get revenge.

Frank Miller's Sin City: A Dame To Kill For opens August 22.
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21 Comments
dio - 8/8/2014, 12:01 PM
Conspiracy.
dio - 8/8/2014, 12:02 PM
I'm looking forward to seeing this.
TheRedCondom - 8/8/2014, 12:09 PM
Rodriguez is [frick]ing awesome! Inspiration to all young filmmakers
NightWatcher - 8/8/2014, 12:11 PM
Hit that red thumb people, we got an Exclusive!

RetroFit - 8/8/2014, 12:14 PM
This just doesn't look as good as the first one. And I think they've missed their opportunity and lost most of the market created by the first one. Should have done this 6 or 8 years ago.
Pasto - 8/8/2014, 12:14 PM
I'd give a kidney for a Batman film shot in the Sin City style.
sKeemAn - 8/8/2014, 12:17 PM
Thumbs for Rodriguez being awesome and bringing us the Sin City sequel.



sKeemAn - 8/8/2014, 12:18 PM
@pasto

An R rated Wolverine would look especially fantastic in that style as well.
yossarian - 8/8/2014, 12:18 PM
TopCat89 - 8/8/2014, 12:21 PM
@Pasto

I've had my fingers crossed for something like that ever since Sin City came out...bring something new to the table!

Here is a taster of what it could look like....

Jollem - 8/8/2014, 12:22 PM
good stuff. if anyone's ever watched the behind the scenes stuff in his dvd's, you can see that he's rather skilled at what he does

SonOfStarKiller - 8/8/2014, 12:39 PM
I love RR!! He's one of the more talented filmmakers in the business. Yes, he's had a couple of missteps, but when he's on, he kills it! I would love to see what he would do with another comic book property. He'd make an awesome, visually brutal Wolverine film.
Kevwebsz - 8/8/2014, 12:58 PM
He should've just put himself in the movie as a detective or something
Floke - 8/8/2014, 1:00 PM
I have very low taste in movies but sometimes even I feel like:

MrFridayNights - 8/8/2014, 1:29 PM
Frank Miller looks sick
MrFridayNights - 8/8/2014, 1:30 PM
Robert Rodriguez would be perfect for a Daredevil Born Again movie!!!!!
macfint - 8/8/2014, 2:43 PM
gotta support this guy and his ethos
Tainted87 - 8/8/2014, 6:43 PM
I think he needs to move on from these lackluster movie series he's been stuck on for the past few years. Sin City was neat when it came out, but I don't think anyone really is hankering for this prequel/sequel. Machete was a spin-off from a parody trailer attached to Grindhouse, and borrowed some ridiculousness from his Planet Terror outing.

His Mariachi movies have improved with each one, but they are all basically the same story, with some different characters substituted. Once Upon a Time in Mexico is one of my top ten favorite movies though, even knowing all of that. He detached himself once that concluded, and now he's stuck again.

Don't get me wrong, I like Rodriguez, and you better believe I have a lot of respect for a man who independently operates and owns HIS OWN STUDIO. He's like the Captain America of directors. I just wish he'd branch out more.
feralwookiee71 - 8/8/2014, 10:19 PM
I was originally excited to hear about Sin City 2, but as the trailers and previews have come out something just feels and looks off to me. I'm worried that Miller might be TOO involved and a little of FM usually goes a long way. Plus, from the trailers that visuals seem overly cheesy this time around. I hope I'm wrong, but so far I'm thinking it'll be a letdown.
MantiniuMan - 8/10/2014, 11:12 AM
Looking forward to SIN CITY 2....

The first movie is a classic...
DrunkenNukem - 8/10/2014, 11:24 AM
what happened to the Predators sequel??

i want it...

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