Why No Cameo From Norman Osborn In THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN?

Why No Cameo From Norman Osborn In THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN?

Producers Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach tackle this question in an interview with Empire Magazine. Plus, they also answer the question of the Proto-Goblin? Mild Spoiler Warning

Here are some excerpts from the podcast, you can listen to the full chat below:

On why Norman Osborn is not in the film:
Avi Arad: Norman for us, in this movie, wasn't an important face. It was more of a symbolic idea (Oscorp Tower) of the world of science. It's a place where his father worked. It's a place where Connors works. And most importantly, it's a place where Peter aspires to be. One, because his father worked there and two, it stands for the ultimate advancement of science and biotechnology.

So the threat of Norman at the top, that's what the comics are about. You can read the whole comic book and you'll have a mention of something that may not appear for two more issues.

Matt Tolmach: We had a lot of story to tell within this movie and Dr. Connors is a very rich character and that's where we wanted to spend time, on the relationship between Peter and Dr. Connors. If you begin to venture into Norman and Oscorp in this movie then...ummm..you just have a finite amount of screen time. As Avi said he hangs over this building and the lives of these people and you know, we're going to make more movies.


With Peter solving his father's algorithm and giving birth to The Lizard, is it safe to say that he will also be responsible for the creation of The Green Goblin:
Avi Arad: If you look at Norman's affliction, if you will, cross-species genetics or any kind of that science is exactly what he needs to survive. Obviously he will support this kind of science to the nth degree and the nth degree is what is happening in laboratories around the world; stem cells, cloning, etc. You have a guy at the top of the building who has a huge personal stake and you have Connors who has a huge personal stake in succeeding. And then you have the man who supposed to be carrying the clue for it, who vanishes. And it happens to be Peter's dad.

Matt Tolmach: They're all sort of Norman's lab rats. There's something that Norman needs and everyone here also has their own needs. And Peter becomes the little mouse. Norman is the puppeteer and that's something we're going to get to.


In the Dark Reign comics we saw Norman Osborn as a formidable villain without the Green Goblin persona. Is that something that could be explored down the line:
Avi Arad: The goblin can be something that happens for a very short period of time or the goblin can become a whole story. The real story is Norman and I think this movie showed, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that Peter Parker is the most interesting study here. The fact that he becomes Spider-Man is great and it's fulfillment, and it's the metaphor for a lot of things but Peter works so well. And Norman needs to work really, really well and be sort of the classic, Marvel, sympathetic villain who carries something personal as the reason to do what he's doing. And the fact that he's going to fly through the air and fight Peter, eventually it will be inevitable. But that's not his main story.

Matt Tolmach: He like Connors, and this is important, is connected to Peter Parker. You get hints of that in the movie obviously, through his relationship to Peter's father and his relationship to Doc Conners. Norman Osborn, the man, is critically important to where this story is going.

Avi Arad: It's all about secrets. Norman has a secret, Connors has a secret, Peter's father had a secret and now Peter has a secret.....All these little hints throughout the movie are saying, 'so if it worked on Peter, oh boy, this kid is not going to have a moment of peace and I think that's a wonderful thing to look at.

Matt Tolmach: Norman is an important character and obviously there's a certain inevitably to one day seeing the Green Goblin. What we've done, and what we'll always do is go back to what serves the story best. Going back to this quest that Peter is still very clearly on when this movie ends, that's going to lead us to villains, that's the best version of how you figure out who your villain is going to be, it serves Peter's story along the way.


On Gwen's story and was there ever a point throughout all the script rewrites where she met her comic book end:
Avi Arad: No, it would've been too fast. It took the whole movie for us to develop this new relationship. To show what a match they are because the more you fall in love with them as a couple, the more you want them to be together, the bigger the tragedy. If you introduce her and get rid of her in the first movie then it feels manufactured.

On Proto Goblin,was he ever intended to be in the film:
Avi Arad: I don't know where the talk came from, not from us. We tried multiple villains before, as you know, and it's really hard to service them all, especially when you're doing an origin story. Also, there was no reason.




Click here to read my Spoiler-Free Review.

Click here to see the end-credits scene discussed by Rhys Ifans and Marc Webb.

Click here to take the CBM Spider-Man Quiz.







Running Time: 2 hrs 16 min
Release Date: July 3, 2012 (USA)
MPAA Rating: PG-13
Starring: Andrew Garfield, Rhys Ifans, Emma Stone, Sally Field and Martin Sheen.
Directed by: Marc Webb
Written by: James Vanderbilt (initial screenplay),Alvin Sargent and Steve Kloves (revised draft)




The Amazing Spider-Man is an American superhero film directed by Marc Webb, based on the comic book of the same name and starring Andrew Garfield as the Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. It is the fourth Columbia Pictures film that portrays Spider-Man in film and is a reboot of the film series that stars the superhero. The cast includes Garfield as Peter Parker and his alter ego, Emma Stone as Gwen Stacy and Rhys Ifans as Dr. Curt Connors. The film will portray Parker as his super powers are evolving in high school.

The film's development began simultaneously with Sony announcing the cancellation of Spider-Man 4. Opting for a reboot with the same production team rather than another sequel, the studio announced a July 2012 release date for what was now titled The Amazing Spider-Man. James Vanderbilt was hired to write the script while Alvin Sargent and Steve Kloves helped fine-tune the script. Filming started in December 2010 in Los Angeles before moving to New York City with the help of RED Epic camera. The film entered post-production in April 2011.

Sony Entertainment has focused its marketing campaign with a promotional website with released images, 2 theatrical trailers, a prologue screening in certain cities and a video game tie-in being developed by Beenox among other products. The Amazing Spider-Man is scheduled to be released in 3D and IMAX 3D on July 3, 2012. A sequel of the film is being planned for release in 2014 with James Vanderbilt hired to again write the screenplay.





Posted By:
Mark Julian
Member Since 6/8/2011
Filed Under "Spider-Man" 7/5/2012 Source: Empire Online
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