New THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN Concept Art Reveals That Michael Fassbender Was Up For Lizard Role

A new piece of early concept art for The Amazing Spider-Man has been shared online, and it gives us a look as a design for The Lizard which was created when Michael Fassbender was linked to the role...

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We've seen numerous alternate designs for The Lizard over the years, but this one was actually based on the features of X-Men star Michael Fassbender!

Artist Jerad S.Marantz shared an early piece of concept art he put together for The Amazing Spider-Man villain to his Instagram, revealing that he "added some Michael Fassbender" in there, as the actor was in the running for the role at one point.

We have no idea how close he came to landing the part, but Doctor Curt Connors wound up being played by Welsh actor Rhys Ifans, and Fassbender went on to star as the younger incarnation of Magneto in Matthew Vaughn's X-Men: First Class.

What do you guys make of this artwork? Do you think Fassbender would have been a good pick for The Lizard? Drop us a comment in the usual place, and check out our ranking of all previous big-screen outings for the Webhead from worst to best below. Yes, TASM 2 is up first!
 

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The Amazing Spider-Man 2



Marc Webb's TASM sequel really is a mess. While the first movie definitely has its share of problems, the follow-up basically took all of the elements that didn't work - annoying, "cool" Peter, overstuffed plot, awful villains - and amplified them.

To be fair, leads Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone do their best with the material and Gwen's demise is well handled, but by that point we've already sat through over 2 hours of increasing silliness, cliched romance and Jamie Fox's Electro.

Spider-Man 3



Many of you were probably expecting this to take worst place, but Sam Raimi's Spider-Man 3 is not quite as bad as its reputation suggests.

Sure, it's tonally all over the place Topher Grace's Venom is... not very good, but Kirsten Dunst gives arguably her best performance of the trilogy as MJ, and there are some well executed action sequences.

Then there's the dancing. Okay, there's no defending the dancing.

The Amazing Spider-Man



Sony and Marc Webb's first Spider-Man reboot is technically a well made film and Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone make for likable enough leads, but it's basically a complete rehash of Raimi's first movie - and it falls way short.

Peter Parker being re-imagined as a cool skateboarder kid would have been forgivable if the script took a few chances and skipped over the origin story, but at the end of the day it's a copy-and-paste job with a subplot involving Peter's parents that goes nowhere, and a truly horrendous looking villain.

Not bad, but not quite good enough to justify its existence.

Spider-Man: Far From Home



I know I'm going to be in the minority on this one, but I thought Far From Home was just okay, and I left the theater quite disappointed. It's a fun movie for the most part and Tom Holland once again does a stellar job as Peter Parker, but I was never fully engaged with the story.

It's basically a high-school romance with some superhero stuff thrown in, and that's fine... to an extent. A couple of scenes with Peter and MJ awkwardly flirting is endearing, but it soon becomes a little tedious - even if the actors do have strong chemistry.

Unfortunately, the action sequences are also very repetitive with continuous shots of Spidey swinging around giant CGI monsters as they destroy a few buildings. We're told that these Elementals represent a major threat to the world, but that never comes across and the movie, in general, lacks bite. The final set piece is undeniably impressive, however.

Perhaps my biggest gripe with the film is that it feels like a step backwards for Spider-Man. Or a step to the side, at least. After having fought alongside The Avengers, stopped The Vulture and helped defeat Thanos and reverse The Snap (sorry, "The Blip"), this movie takes a still ridiculously inept Parker right back to the beginning and basically repeats his Homecoming arc to the letter.

I'm a big Spider-Man fan, I guess I've just had enough of Spider-Boy at this stage.

Spider-Man: Homecoming



This second reboot fully integrated Spider-Man into The MCU, taking the character back to basics for a light-hearted, John Hughes-inspired high-school adventure that doesn't quite reach the heights of Raimi's first two films, but comes pretty damn close.

Tom Holland is terrific as a younger take on Peter Parker, and he's bolstered by a strong supporting cast that includes Zendaya, Maria Tomei and Michael Keaton. Robert Downey Jr's extended cameo as Tony Stark came in for some backlash, but there's no denying that his presence gives this latest Spidey flick a much-needed injection of originality - as does the decision to dispense with Peter's origin story.

A little more edge wouldn't have been unwelcome, however.

Spider-Man



X-Men is widely credited with rejuvenating the CBM genre, but the success of Sam Raimi's Spider-Man most definitely ensured its longevity.

The Evil Dead director brings all of the requisite blockbuster thrills while maintaining some of the pulpy charm of his earlier films to deliver what is widely considered to be one of the best comic book adaptations of all time.

There are a few issues (as great as Willem Dafoe is, that Green Goblin suit just does not work), but for the most part, Spider-Man is about as great a big-screen debut for Marvel's web-slinging hero as one could have hoped for.

Spider-Man 2



What can be said about Raimi's Spidey sequel that hasn't been already? Some still believe the original to be superior, but for me Spider-Man 2 is smarter, funnier, more emotional, more exciting and features more nuanced performances from Tobey Maguire and Kirsten Dunst.

Alfred Molina also makes for a terrific Doc Ock, and is involved in two of the movies standout sequences: the deliriously dark operating table massacre, and that train fight people tend to bring up once in a while.

Flaws? Well, Maguire does pull that weird face while stopping the train...

Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse



When I first saw Sony's superb Into The Spider-Verse I placed it below Spider-Man 2 in my rankings, but after a second watch it just edges it out as the best Spidey flick yet.

This first big-screen outing for Miles Morales is not only a hugely entertaining and stunningly animated adventure, but it plays with the usual tropes associated with comic book movies in some surprising ways, and even succeeds in breathing new life into the well-worn superhero origin story. It's so damn good that any gripes I may have (okay, so it could have used a better villain) seem like minor, almost insignificant nitpicks.

Spectacular, amazing, astonishing - whatever Spidey-related adjective you choose, it'll fit.

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