New Revealing AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON Details On Character Relationships And Much More

New Revealing AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON Details On Character Relationships And Much More

New Revealing AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON Details On Character Relationships And Much More

Spoilers afoot! Revealing which Avenger do the Maximoff twins have the most beef with, and why, among other things, a new set report has surfaced with new intriguing details from the cast/crew



The folks at Digital Spy have just published 25 new and intriguing Avengers: Age of Ultron details that they learned while visiting the set last year; from character motives, relationships and so much more. First up, Joss Whedon teases doing a lot more with Hawkeye this time around. "We got to do some interesting stuff with Hawkeye which is a different kind of dark," he said. "It's been fun for Jeremy because he was possessed for so long last time – it's interesting to not be a zombie!" Producer Jeremy Latcham then reassured that Earth's Mightiest Heroes will already be a team when the movie begins. "This movie starts off and the team is together, on a mission, they're working in tandem, and there are new relationships between them," said Latcham. "Time has passed, so you pick up right in the middle of an action sequence and start trying to catch up. I think that's fun for an audience, to try and figure out, 'Wait, those two are funny together now, there's something going on with them, maybe there's a little tension over there'. You're showing up at a party when it's already a little bit started." Joss Whedon then reveals that Scarlett Johansson's Black Widow is his favorite character to write for. "She has a special place in my heart - there is one scene in each movie that was filmed pretty much unchanged from the first draft, and they're both Natasha scenes," said the director. "She's just somebody that I feel like I get."

Next up, Jeremy Latchmen discussed how Wanda and Pietro Maximoff, aka the Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver, initially link up with Ultron to create a balance of power for the team much different than Tom Hiddleston's Loki. "Instead of Ultron giving a lot of speeches so everybody knows what he's thinking, it'd be nice if he had some allies," Latcham said. "The story that Joss put together with these two kids is really sweet and poignant, and you really understand why they would start on this side of the line. It's a great journey that they go on, from being these rough and tumble kids in Eastern Europe who blame the West, and the Avengers for the plight, the power structure of the world that keeps kids like them down. Over the course of it they realize maybe the Avengers are here for good reason." It's then revealed there is one particular Avenger that the twins initially have hatred towards. "Our characters have a lot of anger, especially towards Tony Stark, and we want revenge," explained Elizabeth Olsen. "We meet Ultron, and he's someone who preaches peace and… believes what we believe, which is that the Avengers create destruction and that Tony Stark's bomb is responsible for killing our parents." Of course, the Twins' allegiance with the titular villain falls apart, and Olsen says, "My character ends up really having to deal with her ignorance. A lot of problems that happen towards the end of the film are her responsibility."




Furthermore, it is mentioned that while The Avengers was about bringing the team together, Avengers: Age of Ultron will be about tearing the heroes apart, in light of the threat that is Ultron and the Maximoffs. "The larger threat individually isolates each of us," said Chris Hemsworth. "It's quite a personal kind of threat, and Thor is potentially seeing the bigger picture here - he has a whole other sort of journey for a while, where he kind of goes 'Hang on, this is part of something else, I think'." Jeremy Latchmen then explained how much of the team's problem is the fact that S.H.I.E.L.D. was disbanded in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, and they don't have a clear leader. "S.H.I.E.L.D. has fallen apart, so this movie becomes Tony Stark and Steve Rogers trying to put the Avengers together without a parental unit like Nick Fury hovering over them," says the producer. "What you realize is that these are guys who work best with rules, and probably do need some adult supervision. Tony has been paying for everything, designing stuff, building new toys, he's the benefactor of the whole thing. But Steve Rogers is very much in charge of operations and missions, he's the moral compass, but how long can Tony Stark have someone else be in charge?" Surely, next year's Captain America: Civil War will further explore that answer.

Mark Ruffalo then said Bruce Banner's life with the Hulk has improved since The Avengers, "but it's still evolving," he said. "I think he does feel more comfortable with himself and his relationship to Hulk, but that confidence definitely gets shaken during the movie." It is then noted that the team has found a way to use the Hulk as a "nuclear option" during battles (which may be showcased in the opening sequence). "He's sort of left behind in waiting as the secret weapon, the nuclear bomb," said Ruffalo. The actor then explains how there's more of the Hulk to be explored, even though there's no new solo movie in the works. "I feel like we haven't even scratched the surface with Hulk, as far as his character goes," said Ruffalo. "The technology just hasn't completely been available, and I think we've sort of been ignorant about the approach, like, what can we do with the Hulk? Yeah, he's great and it's exciting when he freaks out and smashes, but there's a whole character there from the comics, who can talk and has a personality. Is it always just rage? I think there's a battle of identity going on between him and Banner, about establishing dominance, and what troubles Hulk in a very primal way is Banner, because he's the only thing that has any control over him. That sets up an interesting dynamic that hasn't been explored yet."




Moving along, Jeremy Latchman explains how Joss Whedon and the Avengers: Age of Ultron cast had developed a controlled improvisation system. "Joss is such a writer that he'll have ten alternatives written, if there's a joke and he's worried Downey's not gonna like the joke," said Latcham. "Downey always comes in with a couple of alternatives, so there's definitely room for interplay, but with a cast this big you want to make sure you stay on point. You don't want to let the scene wander off into something we all find hilarious on the day, and later in the editing room makes you go, 'Arrgh, what are we doing?' Sometimes when everyone gets together, they're all so funny that they kind of slip out of character, and start saying stuff that's not quite in line with what their character would say. Joss is really great at moderating that on the day, keeping his eye on the big picture." Latchman then explained how Age of Ultron will be Marvel Studios' first "true-blue" superhero movie in a long time. "With Winter Soldier we said, 'Let's make a 1970s paranoid thriller', with The Dark World we said, 'Let's make a full-blown fantasy film', and with Guardians we said, 'Let's make a full-blown space opera'," he said. "Everything else has been kind of its own genre, so from our perspective if we can keep changing what this kind of movie is, and saying you can't pin down a Marvel Studios film... then people won't get bored."

Adding to Jeremy Latchman's comments about Age of Ultron being a true superhero movie, Joss Whedon had then explained how he categorized the sequel in just about every genre throughout production. "With the first one, I set out to make a war movie," said the writer/director. "This time I said to Marvel, 'I really want to make more of a science-fiction horror', but then in the first week I was like 'This is clearly a western'. Then it became a war movie again, then oh no, it's a romantic comedy, a 1940s romantic comedy… No, it's Ibsen! No, okay, it's definitely an adventure. It's an action comedy! I suppose if it's gonna get put in a category, it has got some science fiction in it, but for me, it's just everything. And hopefully that doesn't come out as ADD, but as what happens when you put these different people together, you get that kind of weird dissonance with their different worlds and styles, and you hopefully make music out of it, instead of a horrible cacophony." Lastly, Whedon reiterates how he's less likely to direct the two-part Avengers: Infinity War. "I cannot imagine directing a film with – if you'll pardon the expression – more f**king people in it. I'd love to see one, though," he said. To read all 25 interesting things that Digital Spy learned on the Age of Ultron set, make the jump here. What do you think?




Marvel Studios presents Avengers: Age of Ultron, the epic follow-up to the biggest Super Hero movie of all time. When Tony Stark tries to jumpstart a dormant peacekeeping program, things go awry and Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, including Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, The Incredible Hulk, Black Widow and Hawkeye, are put to the ultimate test as the fate of the planet hangs in the balance. As the villainous Ultron emerges, it is up to the Avengers to stop him from enacting his terrible plans, and soon uneasy alliances and unexpected action pave the way for an epic and unique global adventure. Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron stars Robert Downey Jr., who returns as Iron Man, along with Chris Evans as Captain America, Chris Hemsworth as Thor and Mark Ruffalo as The Hulk. Together with Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow and Jeremy Renner as Hawkeye, and with the additional support of Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury and Cobie Smulders as Agent Maria Hill, the team must reassemble to defeat James Spader as Ultron, a terrifying technological villain hell-bent on human extinction. Along the way, they confront two mysterious and powerful newcomers, Wanda Maximoff, played by Elizabeth Olsen, and Pietro Maximoff, played by Aaron Taylor-Johnson, and meet an old friend in a new form when Paul Bettany becomes Vision. Written and directed by Joss Whedon and produced by Kevin Feige, Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron is based on the ever-popular Marvel comic book series “The Avengers,” published in 1963. Get set for an action-packed thrill ride when The Avengers return in Avengers: Age of Ultron May 1, 2015.
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