Rob Liefeld Fielding Calls About SUPREME Film Rights

Rob Liefeld Fielding Calls About SUPREME Film Rights

Rob Liefeld Fielding Calls About SUPREME Film Rights

Yesterday, comic book artist and writer, Rob Liefeld, tweeted that he had received two calls recently inquiring about the film rights to Supreme. Hit the jump to check it out!

Yesterday, Rob Liefeld revealed that he had been receiving phone calls regarding the film rights to Supreme. The website comicbook.com assumes interest could be there because of Alan Moore's run and not Liefeld's. I agree.

In October of 1992, Rob Liefeld introduced comic book fans to Supreme in Image Comics' Youngbloods #3. He was considered to be the most powerful superhero in Liefeld's universe, something along the lines of Superman. He went through many incarnations but the earliest version had him quoting scripture and had a god complex. He received his own comic book series, which lasted 56 issues. Supreme was published by Image Comics (1992−96, 2012), Maximum Press (1996−98), Awesome Entertainment (1999−2000) and by Arcade Comics (2006).

During its run, Liefeld asked Alan Moore if he would like to takeover the writing duties on Supreme. Moore is the legendary but cranky comic book writer that wrote Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and From Hell. He agreed to write Supreme, a comic he described at the time as being "not very good," but wanted free reign, which he received. Moore then reinvented Supreme with inspiration from Silver Age Superman. Instead of mild-mannered reporter Clark Kent, Supreme's alter ego was Ethan Crane a mild-mannered comic book artist. Where Clark/Superman loses his powers when he comes into contact with kryptonite, Ethan gains his powers from coming into contact with a meteorite made of a fictional element known as supremium. Coming into contact with it caused his hair to turn white and gain the power of flight, super-speed, super-intelligence and a laundry list of other Superman-like powers. Other Superman-like characters appeared in Moore's run: Darius Dax was Supreme's Lex Luthor, Suprema was a reference to Supergirl, Radar the Hound Supreme was reference to Superman's super-dog Krypto, Judy Jordan was a reference to Lana Lang and Ethan's love interest Diana Dane was a reference to Lois Lane.

What made the Moore's run most interesting was that it didn't completely toss out everything that had previously been done with the character. It was self aware. It used the based storylines with the run treating them as a parralel universe. Moore's run was highly-acclaimed and he received the 1997 Eisner Award for Best Writer.
DISCLAIMER: ComicBookMovie.com is protected under the DMCA (Digital Millenium Copyright Act) and... [MORE]
Latest Headlines
Loading...