First Full Reviews For THE WOLVERINE Hit

First Full Reviews For THE WOLVERINE Hit

And the response is mixed at best! Fanboys had best start sharpening their pitchforks as the first wave of reviews for James Mangold's The Wolverine aren't quite as good as many will have been hoping for. Hit the jump for details!

Below, you'll find the first wave of reviews for The Wolverine from journalists who attended last night's UK premiere of the movie. One can only assume that they're somehow unable to have fun or weren't paid enough by studio execs to give it a positive least in the minds of deluded and immature fanboys anyway. Perhaps it's just not very good? Either way, you'll be able to find out for yourselves next week. The majority don't seem to completely slate the X-Men: The Last Stand sequel however, and it does at least sound entertaining. However, with the likes of The Avengers and The Dark Knight gaining such acclaim, perhaps that's just not enough these days?

It hasn't got the swagger of the Iron Man films or the densely layered story of the Dark Knight movies, but it's at least getting part of the way towards being that good. Wolverine's versatility as a character is one of his biggest strengths, and in The Wolverine, we finally have an on-screen demonstration of what that actually means. For all its loftier ambitions, the best gift The Wolverine gives is a simple one: that you'll leave the cinema wanting to see more of the character. And that's, straight away, a vast improvement over the last standalone Wolverine outing... [***]

FULL REVIEW: Den of Geek

It’s regrettable, then, that in a film concerned with immortality, nothing lasts forever. The final showdown, tonally and in terms of scale, is deeply unsatisfying, with ludicrous reveals, bad CG and plot turns so convoluted they threaten to derail the movie at 300 mph. An improvement on the last outing for Jackman’s not-so-merry mutant. If only it trusted enough in its unique setting to forgo a descent into aggressively awful formula. [***]

FULL REVIEW: Empire Online

X-Men aficionados will no doubt get a kick out of this attempt to deeper explore Logan's psyche, but you suspect it won't generate much enthusiasm from Joe Popcorns expecting big-scale spectacle. It feels like there's a great film buried somewhere inside The Wolverine, it's just a shame that Takashi Miike wasn't behind the camera to help make it a reality. As it stands this is an interesting if flawed exploration of the X-Men universe's favourite son. [***]

FULL REVIEW: Digital Spy

Given the critical spanking that greeted the last Wolverine film, you may be wondering what the steel-clawed superhero is doing back on the big screen. a question that isn’t answered by James Mangold’s X-Men spin-off, with a sense of pointlessness permeating every frame. Mangold (Walk The Line, 3:10 To Yuma) promised us the movie was “deeper and darker” than the last instalment while the star, Hugh Jackman, said it was the film we’d all been waiting for. Alas, the wait must go on. [**]


Though by no means identical to Iron Man 3, The Wolverine feels closer to Shane Black’s action movie homage than any other superhero movie to date in that it’s full of references to things that make its creators high five each other with glee (it’s got an even more batshit twist too), and big bold movie cliches are flirted with, and not to its credit, often embraced. The Mariko/Logan romance unfolds pretty much as you’d expect it to, Tokyo is filled with slot machines and sex hotels, and by the final third the dominant arc has return to superhero silliness from its holiday in action-adventure, but all this stylish superficiality is undercut with sincerity. Like one of its stupendously choreographed fight scenes, The Wolverine manages the delicate balance of respect for the source and the convention of the genre, big top sensation, and an unlikely, heart-wrenching emotional punch. [****]


Where is the quicksilver wit and lightness of touch of the Avengers and Iron Man films, or the formal ambition of Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy? The previous X-Men film, First Class, was secure enough in its own skin to embrace its comic side. Mangold’s picture affects a pubescent snarl instead: that’s the difference between comic and daft. [**]

FULL REVIEW: The Telegraph

Yet though it doesn’t have the vibrant wit and zip of an Avengers Assemble, or the allegorical grandeur of a Dark Knight, it’s a step up from the garbled silliness of Wolverine’s first solo outing. Unlike Origins, the storytelling is more sharply focused here, ignited by flashes of stylised superheroism. The good news? An improvement on Origins. The bad? Not as big an improvement as you were hoping for: perfectly decent, but ponderous too. [***]


Based on the celebrated comic book arc, this epic action-adventure takes Wolverine, the most iconic character of the X-Men universe, to modern day Japan. Out of his depth in an unknown world he faces his ultimate nemesis in a life-or-death battle that will leave him forever changed. Vulnerable for the first time and pushed to his physical and emotional limits, he confronts not only lethal samurai steel but also his inner struggle against his own immortality, emerging more powerful than we have ever seen him before.


Hugh Jackman as Logan/Wolverine
Hiroyuki Sanada as Shingen Yashida
Hal Yamanouchi as Yashida
Tao Okamoto as Mariko Yashida
Rila Fukushima as Yukio
Will Yun Lee as Kenuichio Harada
Brian Tee as Noburo Mori
Svetlana Khodchenkova as Viper

RELEASE DATE: July 26th, 2013.
Posted By:
Josh Wilding
Member Since 3/13/2009
Filed Under "X-Men" 7/17/2013
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